SUNDAY

NEW Family Drum Class

New Family Drum Class w/ master drummer, Nana Yaw Asiedu

1PM – 2PM

Drop In for details

A djembe or jembe is a rope-tuned skin-covered goblet drum played with bare hands, originally from West Africa. According to the Bambara people in Mali, the name of the djembe comes from the saying “Anke djé, anke bé” which translates to “everyone gather together in peace” and defines the drum’s purpose. In the Bambara language, “djé” is the verb for “gather” and “bé” translates as “peace.”

Djembe players use three basic sounds: bass, tone, and slap, which have low, medium, and high pitch, respectively. These sounds are achieved by varying the striking technique and position.

The bass sound is produced by striking the drum with the palm and flat fingers near the center of the skin. Tone and slap are produced by striking the drum closer to the edge; the contact area of the fingers determines whether the sound is a tone or a slap. For a tone, most of the area of the fingers and the edge of the palm contact the skin whereas, for a slap, the contact area is limited to the edge of the palm and the fingertips. The basic sounds are played “open”, meaning that the hands rebound immediately after a strike, so the contact time with the skin is as short as possible.

West African Dance Class - FREE

West African Dance led by Master Dancer, Makida Anderson

High energy, poly-rhythmic dances, whole body articulation. Great workout, live drumming.

2:30 – 4:00PM

FREE

African dance refers mainly to the dance of Sub-Saharan Africa, and more appropriately African dances because of the many cultural differences in musical and movement styles. These dances must be viewed in close connection with Sub-Saharan African music traditions and Bantu cultivation of rhythm. African dance utilizes the concept of as well as total body articulation.

West African dance is an essential component of West African culture. Over time, traditional dances incorporated new moves, rhythms and ideas. Through the slave trade, and through national production of traditional dance forms, West African dance has found its way around the globe. West African Dance has influenced many popular American dance forms, such as hip-hop, salsa and jazz dance. Traditional dances are still practiced by many people today.

Dance has always played a very important role in the lives of West Africans. Throughout history, West Africans performed dances to celebrate a birth, harvest or death. Communities relied on dance to ward off evil spirits, to ask the gods for prosperity, or to resolve conflict. Dance continues to serve those functions.

MONDAY

Dumbek Drumming

Dumbek Drumming taught by Frank Lazzaro

Frank has taught middle-eastern drumming for over 10 years, and has released an instructional CD. He is also the drummer for Middle-Earth Ensemble and performs regularly for belly dance shows. He has most recently developed a performance group made up of his dumbek drum students, called “Cairo Beats”.

6:00 PM – 7:00 PM

Class Fee: $15

The goblet drum (also chalice drum, tarabuka, tarabaki, darbuka, derbake, debuka, doumbek, dumbec, dumbeg, dumbelek, tablah, toumperleki or zerbaghali, Arabic: دربوكة‎ / ALA-LC: darbūkah) is a single head membranophone with a goblet shaped body used mostly in the Middle East, North Africa, South Asia, and Eastern Europe. The African djembe-wassolou is also a goblet membranophone.

The goblet drum may be played while held under one arm (usually the non-dominant arm) or by placing it sideways upon the lap (with the head towards the player’s knees) while seated. Some drums are also made with strap mounts to the drum may be slung over the shoulder, to facilitate playing while standing or dancing. It produces a resonant, low-sustain sound while played lightly with the fingertips and palm. Some players move their fists in and out of the bell to alter the tone. There are a variety of rhythms (see dumbek rhythms) that form the basis of the folkloric and modern music and dance styles of the Middle East.

Tribal-Style Belly Dance Class

All Levels Tribal-Style Belly Dance Class led by Sabrina Fox

Sabrina Fox – Director and of Atash Maya Dance Co. and an American Tribal Style (ATS) Certified Instructor. Sabrina’s fire and passion come through in her performances and classes. She is simply one of San Diego’s hottest dancers. This unique class will focus on tribal fusion bellydance drills, techniques and combinations to live drumming by Frank Lazzaro and his students. All levels welcome!

 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Class Fee: $15
Please pay instructor on day of class.

American Tribal Style Belly Dance (also known as ATS) is a modern style of belly dance created by FatChanceBellyDance director, Carolena Nericcio-Bohlman. The primary defining characteristic of American Tribal Style Belly Dance is group improvisation. Tribal is generally performed in a group, often at community events such as festivals and parades, with tribal dancers typically favoring a look provided by wide-legged pants gathered at the ankles (aka pantaloons), tops known as cholis and full skirts.

Belly dance, also referred to as Arabic dance (Arabic: رقص شرقي‎, translit. Raqs sharqi, literally: “oriental dancing”), is an Arabic expressive dance which originated in Egypt and that emphasizes complex movements of the torso. It has evolved to take many different forms depending on the country and region, both in costume and dance style.

In Egypt

The modern Egyptian belly dance style (and the modern costume) are said to have originated in Cairo’s nightclubs then been used in Egyptian cinema. Many of the local dancers went on to appear in Egyptian films and had a great influence on the development of the Egyptian style and became famous like Samia Gamaland Taheyya Kariokka both of whom helped attract the eyes to Egyptian style worldwide.

Egyptian belly dance is noted for its controlled, precise movements.

San Diego Taiko Practice

Performance Group Practice for members of San Diego Taiko

8-10PM

Taiko (太鼓) are a broad range of Japanese percussion instruments. In Japanese, the term refers to any kind of drum, but outside Japan, it is used to refer to any of the various Japanese drums called wadaiko (和太鼓 “Japanese drums”). The process of constructing taiko varies between manufacturers, and preparation of both the drum body and skin can take several years depending on method.

The origin of the instruments is unclear, though there have been many suggestions. Historical accounts, of which the earliest date from 588 CE, note that young Japanese men traveled to Korea to study the kakko, a drum that originated in South China. This study and appropriation of Chinese instruments may have influenced the emergence of taiko. Certain court music styles, especially gigaku and gagaku, arrived in Japan through both Korea and China. In both traditions, dancers were accompanied by several instruments that included drums similar to taiko.

An important part of kata in taiko is keeping the body stabilized while performing, and can be accomplished by keeping a wide, low stance with the legs, with the left knee bent over the toes and keeping the right leg straight. It is important that the hips face the drum and the shoulders are relaxed.

Some groups in Japan, particularly those active in Tokyo, also emphasize the importance of the lively and spirited iki aesthetic.

The sticks for playing taiko are called bachi, and are made in various sizes and from different kinds of wood such as white oak, bamboo, and Japanese magnolia. Bachi are also held in a number of different styles. In kumi-daiko, it is common for a player to hold their sticks in a relaxed manner between the V-shape of the index finger and thumb, which points to the player.

TUESDAY

Children’s West African Drumming

With Master of Drums Nana Yaw Asiedu

Master of drums, Nana Yaw Asiedu has been teaching West African drumming to toddlers and children at the WorldBeat Center for over 14 years. Nana has played with many great musicians of our time, including Herbie Hancock, Quincy Jones, and Taj Mahal. Nana brings the rhythms of Ghana, Nigeria, Senegal, Guinee, Ivory Coast, Mali, India, Cuba, & Brazil to his classes. Come let your child learn through music; they are never too young!

Toddler’s Classes  2:00-2:30 PM
(6 mos-6 yrs) 3:00-3:30 PM

Older Children & Adult Classes: 3:30-4:15 PM
(7 yrs on up)
2:00 pm – 4:15 pm

Class Fee:
Toddlers class $8.
Older children’s class $9. Pay instructor day of class.Register for Information on classes.

A djembe or jembe is a rope-tuned skin-covered goblet drum played with bare hands, originally from West Africa. According to the Bambara people in Mali, the name of the djembe comes from the saying “Anke djé, anke bé” which translates to “everyone gather together in peace” and defines the drum’s purpose. In the Bambara language, “djé” is the verb for “gather” and “bé” translates as “peace.”

Djembe players use three basic sounds: bass, tone, and slap, which have low, medium, and high pitch, respectively. These sounds are achieved by varying the striking technique and position.

The bass sound is produced by striking the drum with the palm and flat fingers near the center of the skin. Tone and slap are produced by striking the drum closer to the edge; the contact area of the fingers determines whether the sound is a tone or a slap. For a tone, most of the area of the fingers and the edge of the palm contact the skin whereas, for a slap, the contact area is limited to the edge of the palm and the fingertips. The basic sounds are played “open”, meaning that the hands rebound immediately after a strike, so the contact time with the skin is as short as possible.

Nana is the Founder and Director of the Ile Ayan Cultural Institution of Higher Learning. Drums balance out the right and left brain, and stimulate endorphins, which facilitate learning

He currently gives ongoing African drumming and music instruction for all ages (toddlers to adults) in San Diego, where he has taught for the last fifteen years. He instructed 10,000 5th grade students each year from 2004 to 2010, as part of the San Diego City Schools’ “Balboa Park Integration Program”. He has also brought his program into the elementary schools, working both as a music teacher during the school day (seeing K-6th grade classes, one after the other, one day a week), as well as After-School programs twice a week for various school districts.

Nana has been very successful in working with “At-Risk” teens, both in alternative schools and juvenile hall settings, as well as working with blind and deaf students. He specializes in teaching drumming via mathematics for all ages. For toddlers and parents it’s math, storytelling, alphabet, and vowels.

Total Body Fitness

Kick boxing workout course incorporating stretching and yoga.                                                                       Taught by certified kick boxer Ray Scott.

Ray Scott is a Certified A.C.E., and an AFAA Kick Boxer. He is a Fitness Specialist from City College and has a  degree from San Diego State University. Scott has been in the industry for over 10 years.

All fitness levels and ages are welcome!
Contact the instructor for more info at (619) 640-0233 or (619) 640-5271

5:00 PM – 6:00 PM

$40/ month for 8 classes every Tues and Thurs, and a FREE boot camp class every Wed at Morley Field!

American Tribal Belly Dance, All Levels

Weekly ATS Belly Dance, All Levels

$20.00 drop in

6:40-8:15pm

American Tribal Style Belly Dance (also known as ATS) is a modern style of belly dance created by FatChanceBellyDance director, Carolena Nericcio-Bohlman. The primary defining characteristic of American Tribal Style Belly Dance is group improvisation. Tribal is generally performed in a group, often at community events such as festivals and parades, with tribal dancers typically favoring a look provided by wide-legged pants gathered at the ankles (aka pantaloons), tops known as cholis and full skirts.

Belly dance, also referred to as Arabic dance (Arabic: رقص شرقي‎, translit. Raqs sharqi, literally: “oriental dancing”), is an Arabic expressive dance which originated in Egypt and that emphasizes complex movements of the torso. It has evolved to take many different forms depending on the country and region, both in costume and dance style.

In Egypt

The modern Egyptian belly dance style (and the modern costume) are said to have originated in Cairo’s nightclubs then been used in Egyptian cinema. Many of the local dancers went on to appear in Egyptian films and had a great influence on the development of the Egyptian style and became famous like Samia Gamaland Taheyya Kariokka both of whom helped attract the eyes to Egyptian style worldwide.

Egyptian belly dance is noted for its controlled, precise movements.

WEDNESDAY

Drop-In Yoga
A variety of yoga styles taught by instructor Vania Oliveira.
Join us every Wednesday with Vania as she leads a Yoga class at WorldBeat Center for all levels. She has been practicing yoga for at least 16 years now and has experience in a variation of yoga styles including Hatha, Bikran, Power, Restore, Vinyasa, and Swasthya. Bring your yoga mat, blanket and wear comfortable clothes.

5:00 PM – 6:15 PM

Super Sonic Samba School Class

Open Rehersal Samba Percussion and Dance. Watch, Drum, Dance, Play

7:45 – 10:00PM

Donations are suggested
Please pay instructor after class

Samba is a dance to black/African people in Brazil who brought much of their music and dance culture into Latin America with them upon arrival into many Latin American countries. Samba music is very similar to and has been influenced by many Angolan music genres. It has also been influenced by many other Latin American music genres and dances. The Samba music rhythm has been danced in Brazil since its inception in the late 16th century. There is actually a set of dances, rather than a single dance, that define the Samba dancing scene in Brazil; however, no one dance can be claimed with certainty as the “original” Samba style.

Super Sonic Samba School is a nonprofit organization dedicated to both performance and Brazilian arts education. Our energizing classes and captivating performances bring the arts of Brazilian music, dance, and costuming to life.

Super Sonic Samba School performs a range of styles: from the world famous Rio de Janeiro Carnival batucada drums of samba to the pulsating samba Reggae of Northeastern Brazil.
Super Sonic Samba School is based on the traditional samba schools of Brazil (escola de samba) – social groups that meet to learn and perform samba and other rhythms of Brazilian culture. These groups serve to pass down these cultural roots from one generation to the next, with the main goal of performing in the world’s largest Carnival performance in Rio de Janeiro just before Lent (Mardi Gras).

KI ENERGY HEALING CLINIC

3-7pm, Inside WorldBeat Center (Gift Shop)

Experience the power of these two Ki masters with over 20 years of experience. Ki/chi or qi is our original life force. When our ki is blocked or stagnate, we may experience fatigue or other discomfort. By pressing different accupressure points along the body and using a natural breathing technique, Ki Masters improve the flow of energy, enhancing our vitality and making us feel bright and peaceful again.

Drop-In for your session anytime between 3-7PM. Sessions are $40 each.

Using the ancient Korean Taoist art of Ki healing, we help you achieve wellness of body, mind and spirit.

THURSDAY

Total Body Fitness

Ray Scott is a Certified A.C.E., and an AFAA Kick Boxer. He is a Fitness Specialist from City College and has a  degree from San Diego State University. Scott has been in the industry for over 10 years.

All fitness levels and ages are welcome!
Contact the instructor for more info at (619) 640-0233 or (619) 640-5271

5:00 PM – 6:00 PM

$40/ month for 8 classes every Tues and Thurs, and a FREE boot camp class every Wed at Morley Field!

Adv Afro-Cuban Percussion

 High energy Latin Percussion course                                                                                                                           Afro-Cuban Percussion led by Juan Sanchez

 6:30-7:45PM

Class Fee:
$10 WBC Members
$12 WBC Non-Members
$5 Conga Rental Available

San Diego Taiko Practice

Performance Group Practice for members of San Diego Taiko

8-10PM

Taiko (太鼓) are a broad range of Japanese percussion instruments. In Japanese, the term refers to any kind of drum, but outside Japan, it is used to refer to any of the various Japanese drums called wadaiko (和太鼓 “Japanese drums”). The process of constructing taiko varies between manufacturers, and preparation of both the drum body and skin can take several years depending on method.

The origin of the instruments is unclear, though there have been many suggestions. Historical accounts, of which the earliest date from 588 CE, note that young Japanese men traveled to Korea to study the kakko, a drum that originated in South China. This study and appropriation of Chinese instruments may have influenced the emergence of taiko. Certain court music styles, especially gigaku and gagaku, arrived in Japan through both Korea and China. In both traditions, dancers were accompanied by several instruments that included drums similar to taiko.

An important part of kata in taiko is keeping the body stabilized while performing, and can be accomplished by keeping a wide, low stance with the legs, with the left knee bent over the toes and keeping the right leg straight. It is important that the hips face the drum and the shoulders are relaxed.

Some groups in Japan, particularly those active in Tokyo, also emphasize the importance of the lively and spirited iki aesthetic.

The sticks for playing taiko are called bachi, and are made in various sizes and from different kinds of wood such as white oak, bamboo, and Japanese magnolia. Bachi are also held in a number of different styles. In kumi-daiko, it is common for a player to hold their sticks in a relaxed manner between the V-shape of the index finger and thumb, which points to the player.

SATURDAY

Emei Qigong Practice

Wuji Gong Practice led by Master Wendy

Increase your health and energy. Master Wendy has been studying natural medicine and natural healing techniques since the late 1980’s, and studying meditation and Eastern energetic arts since 1994. She started practicing Qigong while in acupuncture school in 1996. Master Wendy leads a weekly Wuji Gong practice group in Balboa Park, and periodically teaches Qigong classes and seminars.

10:00 AM -11:00 AM

Free!  Promotes health, balance, and spiritual development.                                                                                    WorldBeat Center Lawn

Qigong is a holistic system of coordinated body posture and movement, breathing, and meditation used in the belief that it promotes health, spirituality, and martial arts training. With roots in Chinese medicine, philosophy, and martial arts, qigong is traditionally viewed as a practice to cultivate and balance qi (chi), translated as “life energy”.

With roots in ancient Chinese culture dating back more than 4,000 years, a wide variety of qigong forms have developed within different segments of Chinese society: in traditional Chinese medicine for preventive and curative functions.

There are numerous qigong forms. 75 ancient forms that can be found in ancient literature and also 56 common or contemporary forms have been described in a qigong compendium. The list is by no means exhaustive. Many contemporary forms were developed by people who had recovered from their illness after qigong practice.

Capoeira Angola de Sao Bento Grande
Taught by Mestre Dennis Newsome
For all ages!
To register for class please stop by one of our classes and speak with the instructor, Dennis Newsome or contact him at 619-518-7782

11:00 AM – 1:00 PM

Capoeira is an Afro-Brazilian martial art that combines elements of dance, acrobatics, and music. It was developed in Brazil at the beginning of the 16th century. It is known for its quick and complex maneuvers, predominantly using power, speed, and leverage across a wide variety of kicks, spins, and other techniques.

The most widely accepted origin of the word capoeira comes from the Tupi words ka’a (“jungle”) e pûer (“it was”), referring to the areas of low vegetation in the Brazilian interior where fugitive slaves would hide. A practitioner of the art is called a capoeirista.

Music is a crucial part of the Angola style and sets the tempo for the capoeira fighters. Songs will also be sung and can refer to what is happening inside the roda, calling for more action, a more cunning battle, or both. The name Angola starts as early as the beginning of slavery in Brazil, when Africans, taken to Luanda to be shipped to the Americas, were called in Brazil “black people from Angola”, regardless of their nationality.

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